electroshock

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PsychSearch.net
Shock Treatment in your Neighborhood
By Colin Taufer
December 2017

Shock Treatment Psychiatrist Theresa L. Clark

Shock Treatment Psychiatrist Theresa L. Clark

You might think the barbaric psychiatric “treatment” of applying electricity to the temples and passing it through the brain to produce grand mal seizures is obsolete.

You might think that a “treatment” that causes brain damage in patients would not be tolerated by a modern, civilized society and would no longer exist.

You might think a patient winning a malpractice suit against her psychiatrist for shock treatment or a class action lawsuit against manufacturers of shock treatment machines would outlaw the practice.

But, as unbelievable as it may seem, today shock treatment is still very much in use and considered legitimate in the eyes of psychiatry.

Last year the National Institute of Mental Health proudly boasted approximately 100,000 people in the U.S. and over 1,000,000 worldwide receive shock treatment annually . This means, on average, 275 people receive shock treatment in the United States every day of the week. Most of them women — they are subjected to electroshock two to three times as often as men. Some are children.

Right now, as you read this, patients in your neighborhood are receiving shock treatment.

Each patient is strapped down and administered a mixture of anesthetics and drugs to paralyze muscles, to suppress fear and pain, and to cut down on the number of broken bones — particularly in the spine, a common occurrence before drugs were used. Next, a pair of electrodes are attached to their temples and 150 to 400 volts of electricity are passed through their skin and skull and into their brain, directly hitting their memory centers in the tip of the temporal lobes. The shock induces a grand mal seizure, damages brain cells, and generates a temporary coma. After several minutes of unconsciousness the patient comes to and feels all the typical symptoms of severe head trauma including headache, nausea, memory loss, disorientation, confusion, impaired judgement, loss of personality, and emotional instability. They are now mentally apathetic and emotionally indifferent .

The attending psychiatrist declares the treatment a success and schedules the next eight treatments, the average number a patient receives.

Yes, this is happening where I live in Clearwater, Florida.  Shock treatment psychiatrists in my backyard can be found below.

Stay tuned as PsychSearch smokes out shock treatment psychiatrists in your neighborhood.

CLEARWATER, FLORIDA

Shock Treatment Psychiatrist Theresa L. Clark
Shock Treatment Psychiatrist
Theresa L. Clark
1200 7TH AVENUE NORTH, ST PETERSBURG, FL 33705
holds staff privileges at Morton Plant Hospital, 300 Pinellas Street, Clearwater, Florida

Maykel Luna Concepcion
Shock Treatment Psychiatrist
Maykel Luna Concepcion
300 PINELLAS STREET, MS 70, CLEARWATER, FL 33756
holds staff privileges at Morton Plant Hospital, 300 Pinellas Street, Clearwater, Florida


Shock Treatment Psychiatrist
Francis K Butler
100 MAIN STREET, SUITE 203, SAFETY HARBOR, FL 34695
holds staff privileges at WINDMOOR HEALTHCARE OF CLEARWATER, 11300 U.S. 19 North, Clearwater, FL 33764

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Colin Taufer

Colin Taufer

COLIN’S COLUMN

Welcome to my monthly column. I am a career educator, writer and lifelong advocate for human rights. With each article, I hope to shine a light into the dark world of psychiatry to make stronger champions of human rights, to stir into action, to enlighten. As always, I appreciate feedback from readers. I can be reached at Colin@PsychSearch.net.

 

 

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