Vicki Morrow, North Carolina Psychiatrist, violated the “ethics” of the psychiatric profession

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Winston-Salem Journal
Surry psychiatrist agrees to place license in inactive status
By Richard Craver
May 29, 2018

Psychiatrist Vicki Morrow

Psychiatrist Vicki Morrow

A Surry County psychiatrist, Dr. Vicki Olivia Morrow, agreed Friday to a consent order with the N.C. Medical Board that placed her license in an inactive status.

The order was made public on the board’s website Tuesday.

Morrow, who lives in Westfield, worked out of her Monadnock Mind/Body Psychiatrist office in Walnut Cove. She briefly had office space with Blue Ridge Counseling Services LLC in Stuart, Va., but was not affiliate with Blue Ridge Counseling’s services and operations, according to the group.

Morrow could not be reached for comment at either office.

The board filing said Morrow began providing psychotherapy and medication management to an unidentified male patient. Morrow went to high school with the patient, but claimed they were not friends then.

Morrow began treating the patient in April 2015, while he was dying from end-state liver disease, having experienced cirrhosis of the liver and a severe alcohol-abuse disorder.

Morrow prescribed the patient Adderall and Xanax after diagnosing him with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

The board said that in January 2016, Morrow began interacting with the patient on a personal level at least every other day, including at his home, and taking him on errands and medical appointments.

In February 2016, the patient withdrew $9,900 from his retirement account to pay Morrow for past psychotherapy sessions.

Morrow claimed the payments were for 40 psychotherapy sessions with the patient, but the board said that prior to the payment, she “never presented any invoices or bills for her services.”

The patient died in June 2016.

The board determined Morrow “blurred the lines of the physician-patient relationship and violated the ethics of the psychiatric profession.”

The board cited Morrow’s decision to prescribe the patient with Xanax “despite his history of severe alcohol use disorder and indications that he continued to abuse alcohol.”

Morrow was cited for failing to adequately document the need for prescribing Xanax to the patient. There also was no documentation that she had warned the patient of the potential harm from using Xanax, including that he should use a low dose.

In her response to the board’s findings, Morrow reimbursed part of the money she received from the patient’s retirement fund to the beneficiary of the plan, as well as agreeing to take continuing medical education courses “regarding maintaining proper patient boundaries and the prescribing of benzodiazepines.”

Morrow is a 1999 graduate of East Carolina University’s medical school. She did her internship, residency and fellowship in Philadelphia, completing them in 2004.

Morrow was licensed to practice medicine in North Carolina in August 2012.