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Fox 8 (Cleveland)
I-Team: Doctor Accused of Writing Fake Prescriptions
by Jack Shea
April 16, 2014

Psychiatrist Toni Carman

Psychiatrist Toni Carman

CLEVELAND, Ohio — A prominent psychiatrist was arraigned Wednesday morning on several drug charges after accusations of writing fake prescriptions.

Dr. Toni Carman has offices in Beachwood and Willoughby. She faces charges of aggravated trafficking in drugs, complicity to deception to obtain a dangerous drug, and complicity to possession of drugs.

Assistant Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Christopher Schroeder, told the Fox 8 I-Team “she was writing fake prescriptions from her office for people with bad names, or for people she knew didn’t actually need those prescriptions.”

The I-Team was outside Carman’s office in Willoughby in December 2012, when agents with the Ohio State Pharmacy Board executed a search warrant and removed records and other evidence.

When questioned by the I-Team, Carman said, “I have nothing to say.”

Carman came to the attention of state investigators when someone using aliases begin filling large prescriptions for oxycodone at pharmacies across Lake, Geauga and Cuyahoga counties.

Agents tell the I-Team that their investigation revealed the doctor was writing many of the bogus prescriptions for the same patient, and that he used the fake scripts to obtain more than 15,000 tablets of the powerful painkillers.

Agents say that after the allegations came to light, the now 70-year-old doctor voluntarily gave up her license.

Prosecutors say Carman not only violated the oath she took as a doctor to do no harm to her patients, she also contributed to a dangerous epidemic.

“You know it’s much harder to make it than simply to get it from someone who has the power to prescribe it to any individual, and when that individual abuses that power and gives it to someone who doesn’t need it, someone who says their wife is suffering from cancer,” said Schroeder. “That’s how the drugs get out on the street, and they become addictive to people in ordinary life.”

Carman pleaded not guilty to the charges during Wednesday’s arraignment hearing, but prosecutors say she intends to plead guilty later this month.