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Albuquerque Journal
Med board: ABQ doctor tied to six patient deaths
By Marie C. Baca
July 4th, 2018

Psychiatrist Edwin Hall

Psychiatrist Edwin Hall

An Albuquerque psychiatrist has agreed to surrender his medical license amid allegations that six patients who received treatment at his practice died of overdoses and that an individual without a medical license was permitted to treat patients at his practice.

The surrender marks the culmination of a series of New Mexico Medical Board actions involving Edwin B. Hall dating back to 2016. Hall’s psychiatry practice, now closed, was at 1709 Girard NE.

Molly Schmidt-Nowara, an attorney with Freedman Boyd Hollander Goldberg Urias & Ward P.A., who represented Hall during the board’s investigation, clarified information contained in regulatory filings but declined to comment for this story.

Under the terms of the March 27 agreement with the board that resulted in the voluntary license surrender, Hall admits no wrongdoing. He must pay $5,000 in fines and $2,500 in fees associated with a board investigation and has agreed not to reapply for a medical license in New Mexico.

A board spokeswoman said in an email that the agreement indicates the board had evidence that Hall “prescribed controlled substance medications and combinations of medications in a manner posing a threat to the health of his minor and adult patients, and six of his adult patients died as a result of an overdose.”

The Journal was unable to determine the names or circumstances of the six patient deaths. The spokeswoman said the information is confidential.

Among the other allegations against Hall contained in the agreement:

• That the New Mexico Board of Pharmacy identified Hall as a “high-risk prescriber.” The pharmacy board confirmed to the Journal that it identified Hall to the medical board as a practitioner whose prescribing of controlled substances and use of the prescription monitoring program database met “high-risk” criteria.